Slow Drivers in the Left Hand Lane could be a Thing of the Past in North Carolina, in Theory

Slow Drivers in the Left Hand Lane could be a Thing of the Past in North Carolina, in Theory.

Are you tired of those “slow” drivers cruising in the left hand lane when you are trying to pass someone? This common practice causes two immediate reactions. First, you question why this person is trying to make your trip, and your life for that matter, miserable. Second, you question the person’s knowledge, or lack thereof, regarding the proper etiquette in utilizing the left lane. Apparently, some of your Senators share your frustration and are attempting to do something about it.

As most of you are well aware, the left hand lane on any highway is considered the passing lane or the overtaking lane. It’s also commonly referred to as a “fast lane.” Many states have even enacted laws making it illegal to use the “far left” lane as a traveling lane (as opposed to passing), or to fail to yield to faster moving traffic that is attempting to overtake in that lane.

Despite this being common practice, many drivers in North Carolina have not caught on. As a result, Senate Bill 303 was filed on March 16th. This bill mandates a fine of $200 for those that drive less than the speed limit or “impede the steady flow of traffic” while traveling in the left lane.

The reasoning behind the bill is to decrease not only congestion on the roads, but also accidents. Drivers faced with a slow car in the left lane often use other lanes to pass, which can ultimate cause accidents to occur.

Although North Carolina already requires slower vehicles to keep right, it does not have explicit penalties.

If this bill is passed, it would go into effect December 1, 2017. Accordingly, for those drivers that experience road rage on a daily basis, I would suggest that you postpone travel until after December 1st in hopes of Bill 303 being passed.

2017-04-03T21:52:06+00:00April 3, 2017|News|Comments Off on Slow Drivers in the Left Hand Lane could be a Thing of the Past in North Carolina, in Theory
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